economics

ECONOMICS SECTIONS:

 

Four Part Series on Economics of Growing Slash and Loblolly Pine
E. David Dickens, David J. Moorhead, and John A. Sunday; Forest Productivity Associate Professor, Silviculture Professor, and Forest Investment Specialist, respectively, with the Georgia Forestry Commission and the Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources The University of Georgia

  1. Economics of growing loblolly pine to a 15-year rotation with fertilization and pine straw.net revenue and rate of return

  2. Economics of growing loblolly pine to a 15-year rotation with intensive management.net present value

  3. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 24-year rotation with and without thinning and pine straw . net revenue and rate or return

  4. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 24-year rotation with and without thinning and pine straw . net present value

Nine Part Series on Economics of Growing Slash and Loblolly Pine
E. David Dickens, Coleman W. Dangerfield Jr., and David J. Moorhead; Forest Productivity Associate Professor, Forest Economics Professor, and Silviculture Professor, respectively, with the Daniel B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources The University of Georgia.

Series paper numbers 1 through 6 revised August 2007. Series paper numbers 8 and 9 added August-September 2007.

  1. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 24-year rotation with and without thinning, fertilization, and pine straw <96> net revenue and rate of return.

  2. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 24-year rotation with and without thinning, fertilization, and pine straw production <96> soil expectation value and annual equivalent value.

  3. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 24-year rotation with and without thinning <96> impact of thinning at various stumpage prices.

  4. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine on a 33-year rotation with and without thinning, fertilization, and pine straw <96> net revenue and rate of return.

  5. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine on a 33-year rotation with and without thinning, fertilization, and pine straw <96> annual equivalent value and soil expectation value.

  6. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine to a 33-year rotation <96> impact of thinning at various stumpage prices.

  7. Financial analysis of growing loblolly pine in a 33-year rotation, with wildlife food plot and hunting lease assumptions.

  8. Economics of growing slash and loblolly pine under various levels of management — a 24- versus 33-year rotation comparison

  9. The economic impact of changing stumpage prices when growing slash and loblolly pine under a 24- adn 33-year rotation

Chemical versus Mechanical Site Preparation in Loblolly Pine Stand Management
Stand establishment is a very critical decision-making phase in the life of a pine plantation. Site preparation (chemical, mechanical, combinations with or without burning), species selection, seedling genetics, seedling size, weed control, fertilization, and spacing decisions made prior to, during, and soon after planting have long-term effects on stand survival, growth, wood yields, rotation age, and products grown.


Growth Response and Economics of Herbaceous Weed Control in Loblolly Pine Stand Management
Stand establishment is a very critical decision-making phase in the life of a pine plantation. Site preparation (chemical, mechanical, combinations with or without burning), species selection, seedling genetics, seedling size, weed control, fertilization, and spacing decisions made prior to, during, and soon after planting have long-term effects on stand survival, growth, wood yields, rotation age, and products grown.